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years and has already, i know, improved training techniques. >> michael skerker is a professor at the u.s. naval academy, and he is the author of this book, "an ethics of interrogation." here it is. this is book tv at the u.s. naval academy. >> is there a nonfiction of your book you would like to see featured on book tv? send us an e-mail. or tweet us. talks about the history of the office of strategic services in china and the successes and failures the organization had. this interview, recorded at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis, md., was a part of the book tv college series and is about 20 minutes. >> on your screen, a professor at the u.s. naval academy, also the author of this book, al ss in china, a prelude to a cold war. professor, if you would, start by briefly describing china's role in world war ii. >> china's role in world war ii is very complex. first of all, china entered the war first. most people in china would agree that china entered the world were to way back in 1937, july july 1937 with china and japan went to full-scale war. that fact, of course gile was not recogn
be very important because of pre-war because china as well as the united states u.s. to lift the asia first and second strategy which has become a major issue. while most of the british try t down play that role and i think in retrospect, both sides had this validity and the argument, and by the time china had becom very important toward the end o 1943, 1944 the nature of the  had changed because the u.s. original strategy was to drive the japanese to the western pacific to the edge to go north and through the japan homeland. but by the end of 1943 to 44 particularly after the battle o the philippines. so the land route which was urgently planned by china have become much less significant. so that's why it is very mplex. >> professor why did you plan the attack in china in 1937? >> that is a long story. to make it short, both japan an china were military and economically in the 1930's and japan has a very different national psyche than the chinese. there are big, divide
>>> was interviewed about his book that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland. this interviews part of book tv college series and it's a little under 15 minutes. >> book tv is on location that the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland where we are interviewing some professors who are also authors. .. >> "in buddha's company" thai soldiers in the vietnam war" what warded did thailand play? >> they were a very close ally during the vietnam war. people familiar would know that not only did thailand send troops to fight along the united states, but also served as a base for many aircraft for bombing missions over ho chi minh trail, over laos and at the time we had built seven their bases and developed a port as well to facilitate the u.s. effort and also many soldiers went to bangkok and in terms of support thailand was the close ally. >>host: did they have soldiers? >> absolutely. they spent 37 -- cent to 37,000 soldiers to fight in vietnam also they sent smaller naval units but defin
. >> richard ruth was interviewed about his book "in buddha's company" at the u.s. naval academy. this is part of book tv's college series and it's a little under 15 minutes. >> host: book tvs on location at the u.s. naval academy in a aanapolis. professor ruth, what do you teach? >> guest: i teach southeast asian history. i concentrate on tie lan and vietnam. >> host: why is it important for students to know southeast asian history. >> guest: united states is still very much engaged in that corner of the worldment we have many alis and partners we're working with, and many students, midshipman, are going to be officers who are going to go to southeast asia and represent our interests there. so i think it's important for them to know southeast asian history to be comfortable with the culture and have some knowledge of their history. >> host: well, professor ruth. one of our long-time allies is thigh taken, and you have written a book called "in buddha's company: thai sole soldiers in the vietnam war." what role did they play? >> guest: thailand was a close ally of the united states during the
>>> booktv recently sought with michael skerker of the u.s. naval academy to talk about his book an ethics of interrogation. this interview is part of book tv's college series. it's about 20 minutes. >> you are watching book tv on c-span2. one of the things we do in booktv is visit campuses around the country. it gives us a chance to talk with professors who are also authors and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis maryland and joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book. published by the university of chicago press. professor skerker, what do you do with theb academy? >> i teach the ethics class all the youngsters have to take and a number to loss of one studies to request to reduce the ethics of interrogation in your book is the philosophical books worth how to interrogate?y >> guest: >> it is the principal question number one circumstances can the state asked.yyyyyyy then there are some practical dos and don'ts as well. >> what is the geneva convention that we always talk about? spec the gene
. permanent military professor at the u.s. naval academy. what does that title mean. >> guest: well, we represent the permanent military professors, a hybrid, a joining of the professor officer corps and professor and the professional educators here at the naval academy. i spent the first half of a naval career flying aircraft for the u.s. navy, and about ten years ago made the transition to academia, where the navy provided an outstanding opportunity to go back to graduate school and get a specialty in a geographic part of the world where i specialize in middle eastern history. >> host: and now an author. "the politics and security of the gulf" is the numb of your book. that's kind of a big topic. >> guest: it is. it's part of the world where the united states has been involved in three hot wars in the past generation, the iran-iraq war, desert shield, desert storm, and operation iraqi freedom. it's a big topic, and it needs to be discussed, and investigated, which is part of the reason why we took on this topic. >> host: in your book, where do you begin talking about u.s. involvement
she and the professional educators year aircraft for the u.s. navy in 10 years ago made the transition to academia where the provided the outstanding opportunity for graduate school to have a specialty in a geographic part of the world where i specialize in middle eastern history. >>host: allen author "the politics and security of the >>guest: it is. the part of the world with united states has been involved in the iran-iraq war, desert shield, desert storm and operation in iraqi freedom. it is a big topic and it needs to be discussed and investigated. >>host: where do you begin talking about u.s. involvement? >>guest: the u.s. involvement in the valleys goes much further back. we specifically look at the persian and gulf even though they sent some ships it is really world for to the united states and military get involved in a big way. surprisingly it does not have to do with the oil. world war ii marked the entry of the united states and its military to provide a secure pathway for supplies to the beleaguered soviet russian allies in their quest to defeat the germans.
historian of u.s. health care systems. [inaudible] very busy during the political season, beatrix, debate about what is best in health care, what is best in health care insurance, what is best for women's health care rights being in the air, everywhere you look these days. so as a -- [inaudible] and ak keepic in women history, i'm sure all of us are looking forward to the presentation. thank you for being here. you couldn't be in a better time for this talk either. such much of grand rap pieds has been very highly invested in the health care industry. hoping to develop seller health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health care here. i hope some of the visitors to town will be able to see what we call health bill on michigan so much of the investment in medical health-related work has been made. dr. hoffman is professor and chair and department of history at northern illinois. dekalb illinois. she completed her ph.d. as it seems everyone at my table did at rutgerss university in 1996. she's written expleasantively on the american health care reform in
beatrix hoffman to you. she is a leading historian of u.s. health care systems. i bet you have been very busy during this political season, beatrix, with the debate about what's best in health care, what's best in health care insurance, what's best for women's health care rights being in the air everywhere you look these days. so as a person addicted both the politics and in academic and women's history, i come and i'm sure all of us, are really looking forward to your presentation, so thanks for being here. you couldn't be any better town for this talk either. since much of grand rapids including grand valley state has been very highly invested in the health care industry, hoping to develop stellar health care education, research, innovation and practice are all on the quest for great health care. i hope some of the visitors to town will be able to see what we call health care in michigan where so much of investment in medical health related work has been made. doctor hoffman is professor and chair of the department of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d as it seems at
antiseminism and -- the gnat disifm which implicated grerm any and many other nations. europe and the u.s. until very recently liked to think that the dark times were in the past. and that religious violence was somewhere else. in society's more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that come complacent self-assessment. it calls for critical self-examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicious that currently disfigure all western democrats. in april 2011, a law took affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from parks to marketplaces to shops. although the law does not mention the words women, muslim, boar can, or even israelied, it was introduced by president as a ban on muslim vailing which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law rear renders. have adopted some type of restriction. on april 28, 2011, the belgium voted far similar ban although the law is expected to be challenged before the c
a chance to talk with professors who are also authors, and today we are at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis to maryland. joining us is the author of this book, michael skerker, an ethics of interrogation is the name of the book published by the university of chicago press. professor, first of all, what do you do at the naval academy? >> i am an ethicist. to see at this glass that all the answers have to take in some upper levels las, religiousyy studies and that they courses. >> would you say your book is a philosophical book or a how to interrogate book? >> it is a work of philosophy. the principal question is under what circumstances can a statey ask more demand to know the secrets of its citizens.y there are some practical dos and don'ts as well. >> what is the geneva convention that we always talk about? >> the geneva convention to protect pow's signed in 1948. >> and how did that come about? what will does it play inyyy interrogation?yyyyyyy >> sure.yyyyyyyy throughout much of the historyy of warfare, prisoners-of-waryy were treated at the mercy
in numbers left them vulnerable. throughout the first quarter century of u.s. independence, written and americans had chafed each other about the population, its regulation, its limitation. even as white americans claim to meet enslaved africans and african-americans, the people they labored for that covered indian land to support ever-growing numbers of the nation's people. the british interfered with then criticized u.s. lanes on both counts. on the continent, the british continue to cultivate diplomatic and economic ties -- ties with native american supporting the rival population for whom the united states perceived the greatest stress. on the ocean britain controlled atlantic shipping for bidding the atlantic slave trade after 18 seven and harassing the u.s. merchants. meanwhile, britain's traditional goal of population limitation, because usually the british thought on their small biothat they had too many people but the royal navy needed every hand he they could find on deck. the british practice supporting american ships to round up back the bond british seamen provoked enor
on a takedown of the treasury in the auto bailout. three guys earned $4.2 billion from the u.s. treasury. you remember that from the debate, right? no one asks, no one is answering that begin today, we got the confirmation from the romney campaign. now, what is this all about? and what does it have to do with the congo? i was reporting for bbc television and the guardian. when i found out that someone had figured out how to dip their hands, their claws into the foreign aid fund, the debt relief given to the republic of congo which is suffering a cholera epidemic. this money was intended to be used, $90 million intended to be used to in the cholera epidemic in the congo and yet it was waylaid by a bird of prey, a vulture, a vulture fund, a guide -- managed by a guy named paul singer. is other middle name is elliott. paul elliott singer who has accompanied by a good name of elliott management so i went up the congo river for abc television to find out what happened and i found elliott management had their claws around the cholera of money for the congo. we reported it on bbc television and the
national defence, history, the u.s. economy. a television series based on winklevoss is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome juan williams to hear about his newest book, winklevoss which in this case will be from 1898 -- winklevoss -- a patriot's history of the modern world. >> thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it is an honor and one i wish my daughter was alive to see. heritage is one of those bastions of liberty in a sea of collectivism. you probably didn't know you are getting somebody here that was the previous rock drummer. this later became significant as a learning experience when i began working on this film but all along my experiences in the rock band were pretty informative. i tell my students i know all about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, has nothing and starving. when mike allen and i wrote a patriot's history of the united states in 2004 we identified three major elements that made up americanism. nevertheless we never provided a definition of american exceptionalism and tearing the revi
has written include national defense, history and histography and the u.s. economy. a television series based upon "patriot's history of the united states" is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome dr. schweikart to hear about his newest book, "a patriot's v. of the modern world -- version of the modern world." please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. larry? [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor, and it's one that i wish my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great bastions of liberty in a swelling sea of collectivism. you probably didn't know that you were getting somebody here that was a previous rock drummer. this later became significant in learning, as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along my experiences in the rock band were actually pretty informative. i tell my students i know all about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing and starved. [laughter] when mike allen and i wrote "a patriot's history of the
volunteer work in the u.s. and around the world. this was recorded in fairfax virginia and is about 20 minutes. >> host: "the voluntourist" is a book by ken budd. what is it about? >> guest: this is a way to do it if you can take two years to join the peace corps. postmark when did you start voluntary? >> guest: i started after hurricane katrina. host mark what caused you to do this? >> guest: it was one of those times in my life when i didn't know what i was doing, and that this opportunity came up and i thought was perfect because i had no skills whatsoever. i did whatever they ask for in skilled people come in, they clean up than they do the serious work. so we did very basic labor. but it was necessary later. >> host: did you feel that your two weeks in new orleans was worthy? >> guest: guesstimate everywhere that i went from a question that. i said, what can you really do in two weeks? beyond the fact that yes, it is helpful to paint a house, but there was an intangible quality that it was good to be in new orleans nine months after hurricane katrina. people were so happy to have
of history at the u.s. table academy. author of several books, including his most recent, american sheikhs, to families,j) for generations, and the storyk) of americj)a's influence in then middle east. who was dana? >> the founder of what later became the american university of beirut. >> added he go about doing that? >> a lot of american entrepreneur real spirit. >> made the family quite wealthy. >> what was his goal in founding the american university? >> his initial goal differ from a became his life's work. he arrived in the middle east and 1850's determined to convert muslims to christianity and very quickly realized that wasn't going to happen and that's the way to make a connection was not to convert them, but to educate them and to improve their lives and tangible, concrete ways because that is with they responded to positively. once he had that in sight he ran with it and develop what they became the harvard of the middle east. >> is is still open? >> it is time indeed. weathered many tough years. it remains open and stay that way even through the tough times of the civil war. >>
it was the other side of the mountain. during the time my parents were gone, working here in the u.s. i will look at the mountain something i parents were over there on the other side of the mountains. that was what it meant to me. >> where did you grow up? originally where were u born. >> in mexico. southern mexico in the little city that nobody has heard of. why mention ak acapulco everybody knows that. it was three hours away from there. >> when did your parents come to the united states? how would were you? >> my father came here in 1977 when i was two years old. and he sent for my mother a few years later. my mother came here in 1980 when was four and a half. >> when did you come to the united states? >> i came to the united states in 1985. >> how would were you? >> in may of 1985, i was nine and a half going on fen. >> what can you tell us about coming to the united states. what was your trek? >> well, i had been separated from my father for eight years. so when he returned to mexico in '85, my siblings and i convinced us to bring us back here. he wasn't going come back to mexico. he didn't
is titled "the shadow catcher: a u.s. agent infiltrates mexico's deadly crime cartels". to my left is c.a. heifner. [applause] >> the title of his book is "mule: my dangerous life as a dug smuggler turned dea informant". we have a very interesting and lively set of books here and i will start by asking chris how he became involved in the drug business. >> my wife is sort of the american dream brought back. i was a college graduate and had everything going for me but i was living with my pregnant girlfriend at the time and we have a 5-year-old daughter. christmas was two weeks away and we were being evicted. i had no one to turn to and nothing to sell, no options. i turned to a friend who i thought would just give me a loan because he was in the drug business. little did i know he was basically trying to groom me because he wanted -- to didn't look like a typical meal. he loaned me the money and he had his hook in to me at that point because i only asked for a couple thousand dollars and he immediately offered several more than that. there's no way you can say no when you are in a desper
legal adviser of the u.s. state department, in other words, he advises the president on what the law is, was gave a major speech last week at georgetown law, a major figure in international law writing, quote, "domestic courts must play a major role in coordinating u.s. domestic constitutional rules with the rules of foreign and international law. to advance the broader developments of a well-functions international judicial system." well, think about that for a minute. american courts can't coordinate the law from international law. they won't have influence over international law and foreign law, but they can coordinate american law. they can only coordinate american law. in other words, by definition, if this is true, if we coordinate american law with foreign international law, he would have to sub board nate american law. it's the only way this would logically work. the fourth person i'm going to talk about for a minute is ann marie slaughter, head of the office of policy and planning -- or the third person -- at the u.s. state department in the first two years of the obama adminis
administration had against him, had tried against him. because syria was -- opposed the u.s. led invasion of iraq in 2003. the syrian government was looking the other way or even supporting jihaddists who were entering into iraq and killing american and allies forces. so the u.s. and syria were on opposite sides of the street, to say the least. he survived that. he survived the association with the assassination of former lebanese prime minister in february of 2005, in a damning un report that was leaked that held syria responsible. he survived all that and actually emerged in somewhat flying colors by 2008-2009, accepted back into the regional order, into the international community, even representatives at an anational plows meeting to jump start the arab-israeli peace talk. so i think he developed a sense of survivalism. he and his supporters. to the point where, when you have another challenge, and the most serious to date, obviously, since march 2011 and continuing today, that sense of triumphantism, that they're on the right side of history, sense of destiny, and i sincerely believe if i ta
if they had not met previously. when the woman replied that they had come a pat asked about her stay in the u.s. acquired wishers in the hallway. the woman explained she was returning in a few days and hope to catch a glance of the president before she went home. i've been arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech. nixon then lost the hearts are continuing to the previous engagement. i use the story to be different type visit to exemplify several key points i wish to make about pat nixon and her public role. more particularly about her role as foreign diplomat. the path that a woman during one of her trial a second review. the traveling she does was the best part of her job as a political wife. sector, is not the wife of ambassador were statesmen. she was just a young woman who would come to the united states versus the second lady and had come to the united states to study. she treated everyone should not as if they were the most important person in the world. the people she met sensors and scared and responded to it. third, she was happiest in her ro
parents, and then being brought here to the u.s. as a child by my parents, it's very common. i mean, when i was researching this topic, i learned that 80% of the latin american children in u.s. schools get separated from a parent in the process of migration. so i mean, that's a whole lot of kids that are being separated from parents, who are coming here, you know, as undocumented child immigrants. so definitely my experience is not unique, but not, there's not a whole lot of awareness, you know, or when people talk about immigration, very seldom do they consider, you know, that other side of immigration, which is the children who get left behind who later come to the u.s. to be reunited with her parents. and we don't talk about how immigration breaks up families and how, you know, it takes a toll on the whole family. so this is one of the reasons why i wanted to write about this. because you know, it's something that it's an experience that definitely scarred me, that has really like shaped the woman i am today, and then also an experience that i think right now with the dreamers, you kno
a statement that said the u.s. of consent system cannot afford the cost at its current price without significant negative repercussions. in this case the company backed down. this is the exception rather than the rule and individual patient still have the power to put pressure to reduce their hospital bill econ so we have a problem of one controlled prices in american health care at the time when 32 million people will be getting coverage. we also have an interesting situation a recent study in the archives of internal medicine was a survey of physicians primary-care physicians 42% of them believe their patients received too much medical care. 25% of them believe that they themselves provide too much medical care. the good news is about 75% of the surveyed said they are interested in learning how the practice compares to other doctors so they can have unnecessary medical treatment. as young residents you have the opportunity to do that and i'd sure with the leadership you will learn how to do that, and you should. he would be aware of the american board of internal medicine foundatio
in the military and ultimately applied for the u.s. border patrol. i was blessed with not only a tremendous career, but a tremendous family. i ended up starting along the border is the u.s. border patrol agent, going through the ranks and then i started using what i felt was a talent that i was blessed with it being able to integrate drug cartels, human smuggling cartels. and i did more undercover work in more criminal cases than any federal agent in the history of our government over a 30 year career. i'm very happy to share those experiences because they very unique. i was the only federal agent experienced being smuggled as a foreigner from mexico to the interior of the united states, going to travel by myself in the back of a u-haul, a chunk of a car can think of that nature. so it was quite dramatic, but it was something i did with a lot of pride because i went after those who abuse those seeking a better life in the united states and a share those stories with you in ibook, "the shadow catcher." >> there's many powerful moments that you describe. i'm wondering if you could share a couple of
. when i was in elementary school in the 1950's, each classroom displayed a world map that put the u.s. squarely in the center of the world. the eurasian continent was split into, as parentheses to the u.s. in order to accommodate this you. i believe i have struggled against this distortion of the u.s. is both literal and symbolic place in the world all my life. we are close in age. so i wonder if you encounter the same perpetual distortion and subsequent challenge? you have 30 seconds. >> absolutely something i write about in don't know much about geography. specifically, most of us grew up with a certain, what is called, projection of the world. greenland looks like it is big, if up in africa. so, as things get turned around and given proportionally, i also included in that book of maps that just turns north and south america upside-down. what would happen if we looked at -- there's no reason we can look at it that way. north doesn't have to be a top. we could put south of the top who wanted to. >> host: we will have to leave it there. i apologize. out of time. kenneth davis has been
. for the first time it's argued largely by leftist historians, and the u.s. acquired an empire with cuba and the philippines. if this were only revealed the deep differences between america and everyone else in history when one of the first things the american congress did after the war was castellon required the united states to give up cuba. one searches in vain for major world powers who ever voluntarily departed from concorde regions. the 20 century dawned a group of liberal elites who embraced the program loosely known as progressivism, challenging these criticized pillars. mr. has still to common law as president woodrow wilson being a prime example of one who thought the constitution needed to be malleable in direct society. if america stood on the edge of leadership, europe entered a decade which convinced itself or with impossible. the book grand ablution captured the view europeans were too advanced, too sophisticated to fight each other. john maynard keynes at the precipice in this observation about how the world recite together, hot englishman could order from the store steps
-authored. other topics on which is written include national defense, history and historiography in the u.s. economy. a television series based on the united states is currently in development as well. we're pleased to welcome to hear about his newest book, a pitcher's history of the modern world, which in this case is going to be from 1898, two just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and one that i wish my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great bastian said liberty in a swelling sea of collect this and. you probably didn't know that you are getting somebody here who was the previous rock drummer. this later became significant learning -- as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along, my experience and about and were pretty informative. sma students i know about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing to start. when mike allen and i would've "a patriot's history of the modern
. she asked about her stay in the u.s. and implied on what she was doing in the hallway. the woman explained that she was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glance of the president before she went home. she then arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so that she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the engagement. i used the story because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat and her public role. particularly about the role of foreign diplomats. first, she met the woman during one of her travels as first lady. the traveling she did as first and second lady was the best part of her job. as a political wife. second, she was just a young woman who had come to the united states and had come out to see the second lady and see the united states to study. she treated everyone she met as though they were the most important person in the world. there, she was happiest in her role when she could take action. the party they were out in the engagement they were going to or
and if they had met previously. woman replied they had pat asked about the stay in the u.s. and inquired what she was doing in the hall way. the woman explained she was returning to indian why in a few days and hoped to glimpse of the president. pat arranged to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the previous engagement. i used the story to begin the talk because i think it brings to light a couple of key points i wish to bring to light about pat nixon and her public role and the role of foreign diplomat. pat met the woman during her travel as second lead. the traveling she did as first and second lead was the past of the job as a political wife. second, this woman was not the wife a ambassador or statesman, she was just a young woman who had come to the united states come out first to see the second lead and come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact on the travels to important people. she treated everyone she met as if they were the most important person in the world. the people
asked about her stay in the u.s. and implied what she was doing in the hallway. the woman explained she was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glimpse of the president before she went home. have been arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the previous engagement. i use this story to begin my topic because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat nixon public role. more particularly as foreign diplomat. patton at the indian woman during one of her travels the second lady. the traveling she did as first and second lady was the best part of her job as a political wife. second, this is not the wife of ambassador or statesmen. she was just a young woman who had come to the united states and then had come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact server trouble to import people. she treated everyone she met as if they were the most important person in the world. the people she met sinister sincerity and responded t
. tonight. >> booktv sat down with wayne hsieh. it's just under 20 minutes. >> u.s. naval academy, west pointers and the civil war, is your book. what do you mean by the old army? >> guest: the old army is a term commonly used by historians. actually it's a time from the time period referring to the regular army. there's a joke that the old army is the army before every war. so there's a bunch of old army. so my book actually starts with the professionalization of the army and it's about how that process occurs and plays out in the civil war. >> host: give us a snapshot of what the old army, prior the war of 1812, was like. >> guest: before the war of 1812, and this is drawing on really historical literature by historians -- the army before the war of 1812 is a nonprofessional. it over corps obtained their positions through political influence, and as a consequence they're not -- because they're not professionals who went through a body of education and were promoted by some system of merit, they don't perform very well during the war of 1812 so washington, dc burned. the early attempts
been left behind who later come to the u.s. to be reunited with their parents and we don't talk about how immigration breaks out families and and, you know, it takes a toll on the whole family. so this is one of the reasons why i wanted to write about this because, you know, it's something that is -- it's an experience that definitely scared me, that has really shaped the woman i am today, and then also it's an experience that i think right now with the dreamers, you know, with the young undocumented people who are fighting to get their legal status, i felt it was an important story in terms of giving people an inside to what their situation might be like and i touch upon the fact that, you know, my family benefited from the amnesty of 1980, i had a green card by the time i was 14. so the moment i got my green card, you know, the whole world just opened up to me and there were so many possibilities that came my way that i was able to jump on because i had a green card. and i would really love to see this happen to the dreamers, you know, for us to give them that chance to pursue
were gone working here in the u.s., i would look at the mountains and think that my parents were over there, on the other side of those mounts to so that was it to me. >> where did you grow up? where we for? >> i was born in mexico, southern mexico in a little city that nobody has heard of. but when i mentioned, everybody knows a couple. it was three hours away from acapulco. >> when did your parents come to the united states? how old were you? >> my father came there in 1977 when i was two years old. and he sent for my mother of two years later, so my mother came here in 1980 when i was four and a half years old. >> when did you come to the united states? >> i came to the united states in 1985 speed how old were you? >> in may of 1985. i was nine and a half, going on 10. >> what can you tell us about coming to the united states? what was your truck? >> well, i have been separate from my father for eight years, so when he returned to mexico in 85, my siblings and i convinced him to bring us back here because he wasn't going to come back to mexico. and we didn't want to spend any more
frantzich is a professor at the u.s. naval academy and is the author. what does that stand for? >> of serving our politicians stumble. i said i need to have a grabber title. i tried different words. >> host: why did you write a book about it? >> looking at campaigns and what do we remember? we can remember when they made a mistake. how many were fatal? what kind of mistakes do we remember and also have that dominates the company coverage of issues are candidates of what we think we're doing. >> host: start with the media and mitt romney 47 beset and barack obama. what was the media coverage like? >> this morning i just ran 47%. how much media outlets and what is the shelf life? it was relatively short. romney 47% but it has been about one month. but they are dragged back and by the opponent or by the events. i'm sure as we cannot of the debates somebody blows say i wonder if he will respond? the issue is which of these gaffe we need to pay attention? is that the true character flaw? we all make mistakes. but now with the internet and youtube now is distributed broadly and more
is currently -- today he's the chief legal adviser of the u.s. state department. in other words, he advises the president on what international law. he's the american spokesman on international law. he was the dean of yale law school. he gave a major speech last week at georgetown law. harold coe wrote, quote: domestic courts must play a major role in coordinating u.s. domestic constitutional rules with the rules of foreign and international law to advance the broader development of a well-functioning international judicial system. well, think about that for a minute. american courts can't coordinate the law from international law. they won't have much influence over bear national law and foreign law, but they can coordinate american law. that's the influence american courts have. so in other words by definition, if this is true, if we coordinate american law with foreign international law, he would have to subordinate american law to foreign international law. it's the only way this would logically work. the fourth person i'm going to talk about for a minute is anne marie slaughter. she wa
numbers. in the 1970s, the top 1% accounted for roughly 10% of the national income in the u.s.. that number now is above 25%. what is more striking is the top 0.1%, 10% of the 1% is now close to 8% so 10% of the 1% is today with increasing distance of where the 1% was in the 70s. i am not talking about incumbent wealth. if you take the wealth of two admittedly hugely rich people, bill gates and warren buffett, their wealth is equal to the collective wealth of the bottom 40% of the income distribution in the united states. two got a very cool to the bottom 1 twenty million americans. that is pretty big. interestingly, this was a surprise. i sold my book to the publishers in september of 2008 just before the financial crisis and then the crisis happened and many people were sad and i had a particular reason for sorrow because i thought the entire premise of my book is gone. the superelite is over. this financial crisis has happened, surely this system is going to change completely and these superfortunes will be wiped out and there will be a real calibration. i wrote a new book
, it was a state was created out of new york and new hampshire. they fought over it. it has its reflection in the u.s. constitution. the article on the closet talks about how states will be made in the constitution, is merely a result of the conflict that we had with new hampshire and vermont. how is vermont going to be a separate state? so we had have that influence on the constitution making of that country. the cover image is a detail. if you look at the whole of it, it has everything about vermont that we need to know. it has an industry going there. it has a church and a meeting house. it has a microcosmic view of what the state is about. the mountains have not only been a geographic figure, but it is an agricultural state. everything that is going on in the state, it is somehow captured. it became the perfect image for we are trying to accomplish in the book by showing the variety. not this one thing, the connectedness to the east and the west end an important part of the development that goes on. it might surprise people about vermont in this one marvelous painting. >> in 1927, a flood caused
, but that all changed for me in october of 2008 when i got a call from my boss, u.s. attorney, mike garcia. he called me in the office, and i have the oh, my god, it's the principal's office feeling in the pit of the stomach. he handed me a printout, special inspector general, it was a piece of the legislation that congress passed authorizing treasury to borrow $700 billion to rescue wall street, bail out the banks, put us on a path supposedly to economic recovery. this piece i was not aware of was when they passed the law, congress created a brand new agency. when mike explained to me what was the agency was going to do, two functions, one a law enforcement agency, a fbi for the t.a.r.p. with guns, badges, special agents, knocking down doors, executing search warrants, taking criminals out of their homes, putting them in cuffs, and in jail. congress realized pushing out so much money it was inevitably going to draw criminal flies to the government honey, and they needed a law enforcement agency to protect the money. second was oversight to bring transparency giving reports to congress and to
the canopy which in the u.s. economy be the big firms, ge, gm, wal-mart, all that. then he got the small business. but it's the small and growing permit the things that were small but can challenge the big and it's what happens in the big tree falls over. new trees to read out of it, right out of the old tree. it is a metaphor, but it's real. when we lose something in the economy, it's vital we reconfigure resources and create something new out of it. so do we need control? we need feedback. we need the capability to repurpose. in this country, we need to build a robust platform for people to realize what they have incited that. that is why people came to this country and that is why people here look for a better future will be like a better future feature their ancestors looked to when they came. so i would say yes, you know, we need control, but we need controls. all kind of interdependencies and self-regulation, what's working, what's not what gets us to the endpoint, which is better may take human lives. it's not gdp, not increase transactions. it's what kind of lives we live. >> hos
" and paul krugman, author wrote train to talk about problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour 45 next on booktv. [applause] >> well, thank thank you very m. thanks to the passionate attitude and technology in shakespeare books for hosting the event this evening. i also am very excited. i think we are all very excited to see probably two people who i would say are unquestionably the most cited economists in the world today. [applause] in addition to being most cited, and as you all know, those are noble laureates, i would have to say from the vantage point of the institute of economic thinking that if i were to nominate two people as being the most courageous economists in the world and the most impactful, the subpoena to find a list. so we're very excited to be part of this conversation. [applause] as you know, each of them has written a book that pertains to our current challenges and circumstance. joe stiglitz spoke, "the price of inequality" and paul krugman's book, "end this depression now!" are part of your goodie bag tonight. therefore on behalf of them i will thank you for
to washington as the nation's candidate for u.s. senate, goes to washington, already six feet tall, at the front of the line when they go to the white house and kennedy finishes his speech, bill clinton looks forward and gets his picture taken a long side of john f. kennedy. he is so proud and he already is dedicated to the idea that he is going to be the person who is going to bring complete honor to the family. by the age of 17 he is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of arkansas and president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about. he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. egos to georgetown. from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for rhodes scholarship and goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother direct him to who are the beauty queens, the ones who are flirtatious, who are attractive and that is where his i has been. until he goes back to yale law
. and as someone says, you can't jump out of the basement. that's as low as it is. and if people stop trusting u.s. treasuries, the $16 trillion of debt we have out there, interest rates are going to skyrocket, interest payments will go up annually potentially by hundreds of billions of dollars, then we would have more deficit, there would be less trust. and so you haven't -- you've wrecked the government's role in the economy. those are my secret notes, i'm going to ping -- pick them up. [laughter] so you have to stabilize that. and you have to figure out a way to get the economy to grow. and that's a long-term proposition which will lead to more jobs. but you're right, there's some contradictions in all of this. but in trying to create more jobs, you can't mess up with the overall problem of the trustworthiness and creditworthiness. you're shaking your head. we'll talk afterwards. next. >> hi. over the course of your career, you've had the most incredible access to all these, um, great politicians in history and even today, and i was just wondering out of everyone you've met, who surprised you t
to get out. as of devotee in this room knows, you were a teenager when the police swept u.s. and put you on trial for the murder. what was the point if there was one where you realized that this was really happening actually not a mistake, not something was going to be our year in doubt when you were arrested was it during the trial was it ten years into being in prison? >> it happens gradually you go back and forth. when you are arrested i was a child myself, i was 18-years-old and a very 90's about how the system worked. i had been raised in this belief that the system is based on innocent until proven guilty, and i thought there is no way they can actually prove that you've done something that you haven't done that should be scientifically impossible but it wasn't. they didn't and it was a part of the place when they would come back and say guilty but there's also they would come back and start sensing you are hearing this to death not once or twice but three times. that's when you realize nobody is going to step up and help your with a stop to that a respected you think there was a p
talking to professors or authors we're at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis merrill lynch. with professor aaron o'connell also the author of this book "underdogs" the making of the modern marine corps." professor when was the marine corps established? >> 1775 but the birthday is us mess. the record always claims november but that is the date that congress authorized but they never raised the battalion raised then. >> day never were. but the first goes then 28 november but 10 november still celebrated as a birthday. >>host: what was the purpose of the marine corps? >> to be the guard on a ship to protect the officers from the crew it was difficult to salish up they had to have people there so the principal job was to be the ship's guard and served and snipers but it is a very small part of the navy. >> this -- record is complete the service? >> separate inside the navy but they would claim when they served aboard they should follow the rules amadeus served ashore to follow the regulations of the
by brent is that you have the canopy coming in outcome and the u.s. economy would be good big firms coming ge, gm, wal-mart, all that. and then he got small business, but it's the small and growing. it's sickening that were small and can challenge the date and what happens in the big tree falls over. again, the amazing thing is new trees grow right out of the old trees. that is a metaphor, but it's real. because i'm really something big in the economy, it's vital we know how to reconfigure resources and create some new out of it. so do we need control? we need feed back. we need the capabilities to repurpose. in this country, we need to build a robust platform for people to realize what they have inside of them. that's why people came to this country and that's why people here look for a better future that will be like the better future that their ancestors looked to when they came. so you know, i would say yes, you know, we need control, but we need controls. all kinds of interdependencies, all kinds of self regulations and ways of understanding what's happening, what's working, what's no
spending. strong u.s. dollar, monetary policy. that is the intersection. if i could jump at the intersection when it comes to democrats is civil liberties. let's repeal the patriot act. would have never signed the national defense authorization act allowing for you and i to be arrested and detained without being charged by the u.s. government. let's bring around marriage equality and get out of afghanistan tomorrow, bring the troops home. lets in the drug wars. these are democratic issues, historically democratic issues but they aren't going anywhere today. just like republicans historically, their shoes have been about dollars and cents. neither one of the parties do well in the areas that they are supposed to do well. they are horrible in the areas that they don't do well then, meaning romney is horrible on civil liberties and obama is horrible when it comes to dollars and cents. >> as a libertarian is it a little tougher to get media attention away from the two-party system especially as the campaign goes on this far? >> for myself personally actually there's probably
' students, and if he won the u.s. senate seat, and speak to them. he did win the u.s. senate seat. rogers never heard from him so he called him up and he asked obama, would he come? and obam said, steve, i'm too busy. i'm getting phone calls from warren buffett and from steve jobs and bill gates and all these important people. and rogers said, you promised. and obama told him, well, you know, steve, you're not supposed to believe promises made by politicians, are you? and rogers got very angry. and demanded he show up. and eventually he did show up, obama. but the point of the story is that so many of the african-american leaders, businessmen and political people have spoken to for this book, told me similar stories in which they were there for him, for obama, on day one. they were what the call day-one people, supporting him, organizing for him, contributing to him, and that once he was elected to either the senate and then eventually to the presidency, they never heard again from him. there was a lack of gratitude. a lack of sense of obligation. and it wasn't only african-americans. it
>> the u.s. defense agency has said information and intelligence are the fire and maneuver of the 21st century. those of you who are familiar with more fighting back since with pakistan, iraq and afghanistan know how important this has become but though one raid did iraq where operator seized the computer equivalent of the rolodex negative a rolodex that tracked 500 al qaeda suicide bombers or terrace filtered into iraq through syria. but the database of 500 individuals that were recruited to blow themselves up was critical with the effort to take al qaeda at it is in mesopotamia apart inside iraq. >> the mother lode of documents seized that has been known as the sinjar parade illustrates the point* nicely made by lt. general lewis, or flynn six years after a 9/11 attacks that intelligence committees representing a wide variety of agencies, but notorious and secret, had been collaborating on the unprecedented capability to crush the terrorist networks. addition to the special ops they used supercomputers and custom software for deployed a skilled and list and to charge just
president bush's decision at the end of 2006 deserted u.s. forces there. he faced a similar challenge in afghanistan between the middle of 2010 in the middle of 2011. his time in afghanistan is the focus of policy book. although the book has a broader week. she incorporates lots of biographical information about him in an effort to examine what has made him so effective and influential as a leader. she has a phd in public policy, which involves a public study of petraeus regarding transformational leadership and organizational information. as a graduate of west point, paula knows the army army from the inside. in her book, she takes readers into command posts and training sites and battlefields. and she was granted a number of opportunities to travel with petraeus and even to jog with him, which as anyone who has tried that knows that they probably deserve a medal in and of itself. petraeus is the notorious for the intensity in which he works out. and it is the same intensity that he applies to just about everything he does. i might add that paula herself is no athletic slacker. she w
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